Inside Nearshoring

What Is the Hardest Thing about Being a Nearshoring Provider?

Is it difficult to build remote nearshoring teams? Cyril Samovskiy, Mobilunity CEO, will help us understand this issue and plunge deeper into all the mechanisms of creating dedicated teams. You also may find the full version of this interview following the link.

What is the most difficult about being a nearshoring service provider?

Alfie: What would you say is the hardest part about what you do? What’s the most difficult thing about being a supplier? Because obviously, I would assume that the hardest thing about being a client is picking a provider, right? But what’s the hardest thing about being a provider?

Cyril: I think, and you touched upon this when asking your previous question, it is a challenge for us as a supplier or a vendor to convince our clients to listen to us or to trust us. Clients may be coming because their market is very much limited, or they need to be able to scale up or down very fast, or they are seeking for specific technology talent that is not as available to them on the market or else. But the thing is once they come to a vendor, like ourselves, they have to be hearing and listening to what we advise. We’re never making the decisions on behalf of our clients, but we are very proactive in our intent to be sharing what we already know. Because otherwise, if we are not accumulating this experience from previous years of ours and from knowing hundreds of clients that we have been working with, then what would be our value that we charge money for. So, there is a good percentage of clients, who are sure that they need nearshoring services, who are certain about Ukraine and Mobilunity as a company, but then, when they come to us, they stop listening to us. They may be doing their own things just because it fits into their process or things that were common for them in other destinations like Asia. The thing is that we want to be heard and we are applying our best effort in our intent to be explaining and proving that our expertise often is of a big need and value to our clients. This is a challenging part, maybe even the most complex, if there is a full trust in between the companies. And that doesn’t mean that we, as a provider, are always right. We are never telling a client how to act. We are bringing up the knowledge, the risks, the best practices, the cases we used to have and we provide the recommendations of the same. The decision will be still on the client, but if this decision is made with the educated mind, that will probably be the best way of utilizing our model, our expertise and our service.

We want to be heard and we are applying our best effort in our intent to be explaining and proving that our expertise often is of a big need and value to our clients.

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Angelika is a Blogger and Content Marketer passionate about the topics covering IT resources optimization, building R&D centers in Eastern Europe and outsourcing.